Prof. Yoram Lanir

Lecture: Growth-Induced Mechanobiological Processes are Determinants of Adult Tissue Structure and Mechanics – A Multi-Scale Multi-Phase Analysis

Faculty of Biomedical Engineering,
Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
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Lecture: Growth-Induced Mechanobiological Processes are Determinants of Adult Tissue Structure and Mechanics – A Multi-Scale Multi-Phase Analysis

Biological tissues have the unique ability to grow and remodel (G&R) under altered mechanical environment by changing their size, shape, structure and mechanical properties. Adaptation occurs since in order to survive and proliferate, tissue cells strive for a homeostatic mechanical environment by adapting their extracellular matrix (ECM) via turnover (production and/or degradation) of ECM constituents.  In the present study a mechanistic structural computational simulation was developed for soft tissues G&R based on the local biological processes involved. The framework incorporates the specific mechanical and turnover properties of each constituent. The resulting predictions are compatible with the evolution of adult tissue structure and mechanical properties. Specifically, the theory predicts the evolution of well-known soft tissues features such as the non-uniform undulation of collagen fibers and associated tissue non-linear convex strain-stress relationship, the evolution of growth-induced pre-strain and pre-stress, the dominance of non-remodeling elastin fibers in load bearing at low strain and the switch to collagen dominance at high strain levels, and the onset of significant anisotropy in tissues structure and mechanical properties.

Short biography

Dr. Lanir earned his PhD degree from the Technion and did his post-doctoral training in UCSD. He joined the Technion in 1973 as a faculty member in Biomedical Engineering. In 1974-1975 he served as the department head. In 1990 he was a founding member of the World Congress in Biomechanics and served in its council till 1998. In 1995-1999 he initiated and led the establishment of the new Technion undergraduate program in Biomedical Engineering, the first in Israel. In 1998-2008 he held the Technion Marcus Reiner chair in Rheology till his retirement. He served as an associate editor of the ASME Journal of Biomechanical Engineering in 2005-2010. Dr. Lanir experimental and theoretical studies are in two fields of Biomechanics: the underlying molecular, micro-structural, transport and mechano-biological aspects of tissues mechanics and of their evolution under growth and remodeling, and the coronary flow and its regulation.

Dr. Lanir won twice the Henri Gutwirth Research Award (1982,1985), the Lee Silver Friedman Award in Biomedical Engineering (1992) and the 2003 Richard Skalak Best Paper Award, by the Bioengineering Devision, American Society of  Mechanical Engineering.